The songs Bill Drummond hates

The songs Bill Drummond hates

In 1994, Bill Drummond's the KLF filmed themselves burning £1m on the Scottish island of Jura. Two years earlier, at the Brit Awards, the band instigated a stunt that made Jarvis Cocker's subsequent antics look almost friendly. Sending a motorcycle courier to collect their Best British Group award, the band churned out a thrash-metal version of 3am Eternal, before shooting blanks into the audience and leaving a dead sheep carrying the message, “I died for you – bon appetit,” at the aftershow. Three months later, the band seemingly left the industry forever announcing their departure through an advert in the NME. 

The KLF have recently denied rumours regarding a return, confirming however that side project, The Justified Ancients Of Mu Mu are creating new work to be made public on 23 August 2017 - a date marking the 23rd anniversary of the million pounds Jura burning. 

We requested an interview with the KLF's Bill Drummond last year and he declined saying he would interview us instead. Drummond did however respond when we asked him what songs he hates. Here is the response in full: 

Dear Phil,

Thank you for completing your Forty Minute interview. Use it in whatever way you feel fit.

As for 20 songs I hate. This is a problem for me, as I don't actively listen to music. Thus neither have twenty songs I love or twenty songs I hate. There may be more songs that I like than I dislike, but I never know what they are until I hear them. The only music I hear is by accident. There is a café that I go to most mornings I am working from home, to get me away from the screen. In this café they play music. It is the café owners playlist. It is pretty wide-ranging. For a few weeks it always seemed to land on a song by The Fall while I was having my second mug of tea. Then The Fall disappeared to be replaced by Suede. Then he got this new young lad working in the café. Any time the boss was out walking his dog, the new young lad would put on his own choice of music. It was always music I had not heard before and nearly always it was something that I found interesting. Yesterday he was playing something called Panda Bear, it sounded like the sort of thing that I imagined they would play on American College Radio in some other decade. I was not too sure if this was a future or past decade. It sort of caught my interest for this reason alone.

Music for me can be devided into two categories. 
They are:
Music I have not heard before.
And
Music I have heard before.
I much prefer music I have not heard before. 

During the act of hearing music for the first time it can engage me, if there are new ideas and new attitudes that I have not been confronted with before. But if perchance I hear it again, the impact is less. And then even less the third, fourth, fifth time etc.

To counter this, there are times when I hear a piece of music from decades ago, that I may have loathed at the time for all sorts of reasons, but now I hear it as some sort of huge sculpture. It can take on a three dimensional  form in my head and I hear it as a great work of art, greater than any visual artist may have achieved at a similar time. And whoever made the music had no pretensions to high art, they were just making a record and hoped somebody might buy it.

Thirty Nine years ago next month, I watched The Clash at Eric's. I had not heard The Clash before. While I was watching them, I thought they were the most exciting band I had ever witnessed. From the moment they walked off stage, they bit by bit became more boring in my head. By the time that I next saw them at Bonds in New York, they were the dullest band I had ever seen. 

This has also happened the other way around – I saw The Rolling Stones in Hyde Park in 1969 – they were shit. I walked away totally board. I had saved up my money to get the train down to London to see them and they were crap. On 31 May 1982 I got invited by a friend to see The Rolling Stones play a secret gig in The 100 Club, Oxford Street, London. They were totally brilliant in every way. And I could not believe how short Mick Jagger was.

The above will have to do as my answer to your question. If you want to use it, you have to use it all – from Dear Phil, to Yours, Bill Drummond.
 

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