Honyock shares video for 'Heather'

Honyock shares video for 'Heather'

On the cusp of their first U.S. tour, Honyock has released a video for their song “Heather.” The dreamy, sunshine-and-nostalgia-soaked tune comes off their debut LP, El Castillo, which arrives in the UK on the 24 August via Friendship Fever.

Directed by Jesika Gatdula, who the band also credits as official Honyock Historian, the video is a polaroid-tender pastiche of candid footage from a brief tour to Boise and Portland and a performance inside their “Record Dungeon.” Spencer Hoffman says Gatdula’s vision was to “tell the story of Honyock, from the Record Dungeon to out on the road.” The “Heather” video arrives at the perfect time for those of us wanting to cling to the promise of long days and warm evenings just a little longer.

Honyock’s sound is simultaneously familiar and captivating, drawing you in with brief flashes of deja vu and taking you for an inventive ride along a winding trail of luminescent and satisfying hooks. El Castillo’s rewarding blend of psychedelia, guitar-driven rock ‘n roll, and glam-sprinkled pop borrows only what it needs from bygone eras and gleefully improvises the rest.

Produced by Dave Vandervelde of Tess & Dave and Father John Misty, El Castillo represents a sort of rebirth for the band. Around 2015, Honyock had been recording a catalog of their songs but, according to Mason Hoffman, “were feeling stagnant...We needed to take that leap of faith to keep the band alive.” The album’s namesake, Thomas Castillo, is a friend of the band who passed these demos on to Chris and Sabrina Watson, formerly of Park the Van Records and current heads of Friendship Fever. From there, the tracks wound up with Vandervelde. El Castillo was recorded at New Monkey studio in L.A., which once belonged to Elliott Smith.

“Heather” beautifully displays the interplay between the fuzzy sweetness of the past and the surreal immediacy of the moment. “It’s okay to reflect,” says Tyler Wolter of the song, “but we have to be careful not to dwell.” The dynamism of Wolter’s roiling bass line at the song’s intro conveys this message, as do Christian Meinke’s gently marching beats and Spencer’s lyrical reflections. When he sings, “Looking for my future in a calendar of squares,” you’re hit with the absurdity of yearning. And when the horns come in with their honey-warm sound, you’re reminded that it’s okay to be content with the present.

Phaze What Shares New EP 'I Ain't Finished With You'

Phaze What Shares New EP 'I Ain't Finished With You'

Two Medicine announce debut album "Astropsychosis"

Two Medicine announce debut album "Astropsychosis"

0